Computer Case, also known as a chassis, tower, system unit, or cabinet, is the enclosure that contains most of the components of a personal computer.

Cases can come in many different sizes. The size and shape of a computer case is usually determined by the form factor of the motherboard, since it is the largest component of most computers. Cases are also referred to by their size.

Consequently, PC form factors typically specify only the internal dimensions and layout of the case. Form factors for rack-mounted and blade servers may include precise external dimensions as well, since these cases must themselves fit in specific enclosures.

For example, a case designed for an ATX motherboard and power supply may take on several external forms such as a vertical tower, a flat desktop (height < width) or pizza box designed to sit on the desk under the computer's monitor). Full-size tower cases are typically larger in volume than desktop cases, with more room for drive bays, expansion slots, and custom or all-in-one water cooling solutions. Desktop cases—and mini-tower cases under about 46 cm high—are popular in business environments where space is at a premium.

Currently, the most popular form factor for desktop computers is ATX, although microATX and small form factors have also become very popular for a variety of uses. In the high-end segment the unofficial and loosely defined XL-ATX specification appeared around 2009. It extends the length of the mainboard to accommodate four graphics cards with dual-slot coolers.

Full tower cases are typically 56 cm or more in height and intended to stand on the floor. They can have anywhere from six to ten externally accessible drive bays.

However as computing technology moves from floppy disks and CD-ROMs to large capacity hard drives, USB flash drives, and network-based solutions, today's full tower cases typically have only no, one, or two external bays for CD drives, with the internal bays moved elsewhere in the case to improve airflow.

The full tower case was developed to house file servers which would typically be tasked with serving data from expensive CD-ROM databases which held more data than the hard drives commonly available. Hence many full tower cases include locking doors and other physical security features to prevent theft of the discs. Today, full tower cases are commonly used by enthusiasts as showpiece display cases with custom water cooling, lighting, and tempered glass.

Cackle Telecommunications is proud to provide PC Case to NZ businesses. Choose from a selection of vendors, explore our products to find the right solution for you.

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