An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is a device that allows a computer to keep running for at least a short time when the primary power source is lost. UPS devices also provide protection from power surges.

A UPS contains a battery that “kicks in” when the device senses a loss of power from the primary source. If an end user is working on the computer when the UPS notifies of the power loss, they have time to save any data they are working on and exit before the secondary power source (the battery) runs out. When all power runs out, any data in your computer’s random access memory (RAM) is erased. When power surges occur, a UPS intercepts the surge so that it does not damage the computer.

Every UPS converts incoming AC to DC through a rectifier and converts it back with an inverter. Batteries or flywheels store energy to use in a utility failure. A bypass circuit routes power around the rectifier and inverter, running the IT load on incoming utility or generator power.

While these systems are commonly called double-conversion, line-interactive and standby designs, these terms have been used inconsistently and manufacturers implement them differently: At least one system allows any of the three modes. The International ElectroTechnical Commission (IEC) adopted more technically descriptive terminology in IEC Std. 62040.

Types of UPSs and their core features
Voltage and frequency independent (VFI)
Voltage independent (VI)
Voltage and frequency dependent (VFD)

Cackle Telecommunications is proud to provide UPS to NZ businesses. Choose from a selection of vendors, explore our products to find the right solution for you.